Movie short. Images of the letter A written in dye, acquired at eight distinct wavelengths and at four different time delays: 0, 4, 8, and 12 picoseconds (ps). Each of the four columns comes from a single laser pulse. The technique captures both spatial and spectral information on the picosecond timescale. (See video below.)Movie short. Images of the letter A written in dye, acquired at eight distinct wavelengths and at four different time delays: 0, 4, 8, and 12 picoseconds (ps). Each of the four columns comes from a single laser pulse. The technique captures both spat… Show more
Movie short. Images of the letter A written in dye, acquired at eight distinct wavelengths and at four different time delays: 0, 4, 8, and 12 picoseconds (ps). Each of the four columns comes from a single laser pulse. The technique captures both spatial and spectral information on the picosecond timescale. (See video below.)

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Generating images at a rate of more than a trillion per second, today’s fastest cameras can catch molecules as they react with one another. But despite this high rate, when observing nonluminous objects, they can only produce a handful of images in a single sequence. Engineers have now demonstrated a rate of nearly four trillion frames per second, capturing as many as 60 consecutive images. The technique should allow video analysis of ultrafast processes such as the interaction of light with eye tissue in laser surgery.

High-quality, fast cameras use semiconductor structures called CCD arrays to rapidly store image data before moving them off to longer-term storage. At the highest speeds, these cameras can only produce a handful of consecutive frames, mainly because of the limited CCD space. The images must be stored in nonoverlapping

Article source: https://physics.aps.org/articles/v12/55