NutzWorld SportzNutz EntertainmentNutz ComputerNutz GamezNutz TinyStart InfoTiki News

Bust ‘Em All: Let’s De-Monopolize Tech, Telecoms AND Entertainment

The early 1980s were a period of tremendous foment and excitement for tech. In the four years between 1980 and 1984, Americans met:

But no matter how exciting things were in Silicon Valley during those years, even more seismic changes were afoot in Washington, D.C., where a jurist named Robert Bork found the ear of President Reagan and a coterie of elite legal insiders and began to fundamentally reshape US antitrust law.

Bork championed an antitrust theory called “the consumer welfare standard,” which reversed generations of American competition law, insisting that monopolies and monopolistic conduct were rarely a problem and that antitrust law should only be invoked when there was “consumer harm” in the form of higher prices immediately following from a merger or some other potentially anti-competitive action.

Tech and lax antitrust enforcement grew up together. For 40 years, we’ve lived through two entwined experiments: the Internet and its foundational design principle that anyone should be able to talk to anyone using any protocol without permission from anyone else; and the consumer welfare standard, and its bedrock idea that monopolies are not harmful unless prices increase.

It’s not a pretty sight. Forty years on and much of the dynamism of technology has been choked out of the industry, with a few firms attaining seemingly permanent dominance over our digital lives, maintaining their rule by buying or merging with competitors, blocking interoperability, and holding whole markets to ransom.

Thankfully, things are starting to change. Congress’s long-dormant appetite for fighting monopolists is awakening, with hard-charging hearings and far-reaching legislative proposals.

And yet… Anyone who hangs out in policy circles has heard the rumors: this was all cooked up by Big Cable, the telecom giants who have been jousting with tech

Article source: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2020/09/bust-em-all-lets-de-monopolize-tech-telecoms-and-entertainment

About Michael

Bust ‘Em All: Let’s De-Monopolize Tech, Telecoms AND Entertainment

The early 1980s were a period of tremendous foment and excitement for tech. In the four years between 1980 and 1984, Americans met:

But no matter how exciting things were in Silicon Valley during those years, even more seismic changes were afoot in Washington, D.C., where a jurist named Robert Bork found the ear of President Reagan and a coterie of elite legal insiders and began to fundamentally reshape US antitrust law.

Bork championed an antitrust theory called “the consumer welfare standard,” which reversed generations of American competition law, insisting that monopolies and monopolistic conduct were rarely a problem and that antitrust law should only be invoked when there was “consumer harm” in the form of higher prices immediately following from a merger or some other potentially anti-competitive action.

Tech and lax antitrust enforcement grew up together. For 40 years, we’ve lived through two entwined experiments: the Internet and its foundational design principle that anyone should be able to talk to anyone using any protocol without permission from anyone else; and the consumer welfare standard, and its bedrock idea that monopolies are not harmful unless prices increase.

It’s not a pretty sight. Forty years on and much of the dynamism of technology has been choked out of the industry, with a few firms attaining seemingly permanent dominance over our digital lives, maintaining their rule by buying or merging with competitors, blocking interoperability, and holding whole markets to ransom.

Thankfully, things are starting to change. Congress’s long-dormant appetite for fighting monopolists is awakening, with hard-charging hearings and far-reaching legislative proposals.

And yet… Anyone who hangs out in policy circles has heard the rumors: this was all cooked up by Big Cable, the telecom giants who have been jousting with tech

Article source: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2020/09/bust-em-all-lets-de-monopolize-tech-telecoms-and-entertainment

About Michael
%d bloggers like this: